UUS Meeting Virtually Due to COVID-19

UUS is currently closed as a preemptive measure against COVID-19. In the interim, Sunday services will be streamed via Zoom at 10 a.m. Read more »

The congregation was officially recognized as a Green Sanctuary by the Unitarian Universalist Association in 2017. The certification process involved several years of preparatory work, followed by a thorough evaluation by an accreditation committee.

As a Green Sanctuary congregation, we are committed to continually educating ourselves on ways to live in greater harmony with the Earth, while creating projects in the following four focus areas:

Sustainable living

Sustainable living requires us to treat the world more gently by using fewer resources and being mindful of the choices we make. Our commitment to this ideal led us in 2017 to build the “greenest church in Iowa.” Our facility incorporates many sustainable building techniques, is powered largely by solar and geothermal energy, and is surrounded by woodlands that we actively conserve for natural habitat.

Environmental justice

Recognizing that marginalized communities are often hit first and hardest by environmental crises, we commit to working in solidarity with communities most affected by climate change. One of our ongoing projects is to send teams to directly assist with the Chico Mendes reforestation project in Guatemala.

Eco-centered worship & celebration

As we work together towards a cleaner, more just and sustainable world, worship enables us to stay connected to each other and to celebrate the work we have accomplished. We annually celebrate Earth Day, and environmental themes are frequently featured and woven into our services. We also support an active chapter of Covenant of Unitarian Universalist Pagans (CUUPs), an earth-centered spirituality group that conducts frequent rituals, celebrations, and workshops.

Nature-based religious education

Religious education shapes the attitudes and practices of children, families and the entire adult congregation while inspiring us to keep working toward our goal of sustainable practices. Our religious education classes often use our ten-acre woodland property as an outdoor learning environment, and lessons, activities, and field trips frequently center around nature-based themes.